AFS 2015 Portland

Important Deadlines for Submissions

• 16 January 2015
Proposals for Symposia are due.
• 13 March 2015
Abstracts for posters, for oral papers submitted to contributed sessions, and abstracts for orals invited by a symposium organizer are due.

http://2015.fisheries.org/

The Oregon Chapter and Western Division of the American Fisheries Society cordially invite you to attend the 145th Annual Meeting that will be convened in Portland from 16 to 20 August 2015. A diverse program, unconstrained by a single theme, will feature the latest scientific knowledge, management applications, policy implications, and educational pursuits related to freshwater and marine resources.

The city of Portland is blessed with an abundance of diversity and an appealing laid back and relaxed pace. The downtown area of Portland offers unique experiences and endless activities from wine bars in historic buildings to art galleries housed in modern buildings. The city is repeatedly ranked as one of the best walking cities in the United States. It is this walkability that will allow you to easily visit the countless restaurants, food carts, microbreweries, distilleries, and coffee shops that have led to Portland being recognized for its outstanding culinary and beverage scene. Portland and the surrounding Pacific Coast-Wine Country-Cascades-Columbia River Gorge landscapes provide endless opportunities for sightseeing, outdoor adventure, and fishing. The city of Portland and surrounding areas have something for everyone to enjoy in August 2015!

Donna Parrish is the new AFS president

BETHESDA, MD—Donna L. Parrish of Burlington, Vermont, has become the 130th President of the American Fisheries Society. Parrish is the Unit Leader of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and a Research Professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont. She assumed office on August 20, 2014 at the AFS 144th Annual Meeting in Québec City, Canada, succeeding Bob Hughes, who became Immediate Past President.

Donna-AFS

“My priorities remain the same as when I ran for office four years ago: increasing educational opportunities for students and professional biologists, working on communication among AFS members, diversifying the fisheries workforce, increasing AFS involvement with other international fisheries societies, and increasing the transparency of the AFS Governing Board,” Parrish said.

Parrish’s major research interests include determining lake and stream fish population and community structure and function relative to basic ecological principles of competition, predation, and predator-prey interactions; and investigating multi-scaled habitat requirements, especially in salmonids. She earned her Ph.D. in zoology at The Ohio State University in 1988, her M.S. in biology at Murray State University in 1984, and her B.S. in biology at Southeast Missouri State University in 1974. Her long and active role in AFS includes service as president of the Northeastern Division and the Education Section, along with work on numerous committees and symposia.

“Donna’s impressive track record of leadership speaks for itself,” said AFS Executive Director Doug Austen. “We look forward to working with her to address some relevant and pressing issues and expect to make headway on many of the ambitious goals set forth in our new Strategic Plan.”

***

Founded in 1870, the American Fisheries Society (AFS) is the world’s oldest and largest fisheries science society. The mission of AFS is to improve the conservation and sustainability of fishery resources and aquatic ecosystems by advancing fisheries and aquatic science and promoting the development of fisheries professionals. With five journals and numerous books and conferences, AFS is the leading source of fisheries science and management information in North America and around the world.
AFS, american fisheries society, Burlington, Donna L. Parrish, University of Vermont, USGS, Vermont

The members of Cal-Neva AFS would like to extend a big thanks to all the contributors to the 2014 conference

Greetings

Well the dust is finally starting to settle on the 2014 conference and the final numbers are coming in.  This was the largest and most successful Cal-Neva AFS chapter meeting in our 48 year history.  We had over 400 members attend the meeting in Old Town Sacramento.  We have so many people to thank including the sponsors, vendors, raffle donors and volunteers that made this meeting a huge success.  I will update this post in the coming week with the list of sponsors, donors, vendors and volunteers.  Stay tuned.

Best Student Paper and Poster Awards

For the 14th straight year, the Northern California District of the American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists (AIFRB) presided over the judging of student oral presentations and posters at the American Fisheries Society 48th Annual Cal-Neva Chapter Meeting that took place on March 27-29, 2014, in Sacramento, California.  Nine student papers and six posters were in the running for cash prize awards, including $150 each for Best Student Oral Presentation and Best Student Poster.  Best Student Presentation and Poster – Runner up were each awarded $125.  There was a tie for third place in the Best Student Presentation category, both of whom received $75, as did the Third Place Poster.  This year an Honorable Mention was also presented ($50) in the Best Student Presentation category. The 2014 award winners were:

 

Student Presentations

Best Student Paper                                         Megan Sabal, UC Santa Cruz

Best Student Paper – Runner Up                   Jamilynn Polleto, UC Davis

Best Student Paper – Third Place (tie)           Ethan Mora, UC Davis

Best Student Paper – Third Place (tie)           Tye Nichols, San Diego State University

Honorable Mention                                         Emily Miller, UC Davis

 

Student Posters

Best Student Poster                                        Katie McElroy, UC Santa Cruz

Best Student Poster – Runner Up                  Kristina Ho/Katie Lee, UC Davis

Best Student Poster – Third Place                  Sarah Baird, UC Davis

 

Congratulations to the winners and many thanks to the Northern (and Southern) California District, as well as AFS Cal-Neva Chapter member judges who participated in the student evaluations.

-Tom Keegan-

Raffle Grand Prize is a Moken 10 Kayak

RAFFLE TIME

This years raffle is shaping up to be another exciting collection of fishing gear, art, libation and of course the grand prize is a kayak.  We are still accepting donations for raffle prizes.  We would love to have your artistic creations available.  Who doesn’t love fish art.  Also if you have a particular unique skill, you could donate your time or expertise.  I will be donating time for otolith micro-chemistry…..now how cool is that.  I’ll even let you run the laser!  If you have items you would like to donate please contact the raffle chair, Russell Barabe Russell.Barabe@wildlife.ca.gov or myself jahobbs@ucdavis.edu

Moken 10

Preliminary Schedule of Oral Presentations

 

Friday Morning Plenary Session, March 28, 2014

Location

Time

Speakers

 

 

Old Sacramento Ballroom

(8:30am-12:00pm)

8:30am − 8:45am

Welcome: Patrick Crain, Cal-Neva AFS President

8:45am − 9:00am

Moderator: Norm Ponferrada, Cal-Neva AFS President-elect

9:00am − 9:25am

Stephanie Carlson

Associate Professor, University of California Berkeley

9:25am − 9:50am

David Manning

Principal Environmental Scientist, Sonoma County Water Agency

9:50am − 10:15am

Jeff McLain

Division Manager, NOAA Fisheries Central Valley Office

10:15am − 10:40

Break

10:40am − 11:05am

Christina Swanson

Director, Science Center, Natural Resources Defense Council

11:05am − 11:30am

Bradley Cavallo

President, Senior Scientist, Cramer Fish Sciences

11:30am − 12:00pm

Panel Discussion Session

Friday Morning Plenary Session, March 28, 2014

Location

1st Session (1:00pm-3:00pm)

2nd Session (3:20pm-5:00pm)

Steamboat

 

Hydroacoustic

Cynthia LeDoux-Bloom

Dam Removal & Water Quality

Michael Carbiener

 

1:00pm − 1:20pm

James Reyff

Underwater anthropogenic sound that may harm fish:  Fundamentals, monitoring and control

3:00pm − 3:20pm

BREAK

1:20pm − 1:40pm

Jacqueline Pearson-Meyer

Assessing the effects on fishes from pile driving sound: Application of hydroacoustic criteria

3:20pm − 3:40pm

Shawn Chartrand

Perspectives on design of step-pool stream channel segments

1:40pm − 2:00pm

Melinda Molnar

Pile driving on large bridge projects in CA; Case studies of aquatic species impacts and attenuation methodology

3:40pm − 4:00pm

Michelle Workman

Successes from a low head dam removal project on an ephemeral Mokelumne River tributary in the Central Valley of California

2:00pm − 2:20pm

Christa Woodley

Effects of short-term tidal turbine exposure on fish hearing and tissues

4:00pm − 4:20pm

Chris Hammersmark

Branciforte dam removal project, Branciforte Creek, Santa Cruz, California

2:20pm − 2:40pm

Tye Nichols

Physiological effects of boat noise on a coastal marine fish, the giant kelpfish (Heterostichus rostratus)

4:20pm − 4:40pm

Carrie Austin

Reservoir management strategies to reduce fish mercury levels: An integral part of the statewide reservoir mercury TMDL

2:40pm − 3:00pm

Sarika Cullis-Suzuki

Effects of boat noise on a wild, vocal fish, plainfin midshipman (Porichthys notatus)

4:40pm − 5:00pm

Stephen Louie

Important factors influencing predatory fish mercury concentrations in California reservoirs: A statistical approach

Friday Afternoon Technical Session, March 28, 2014

Location

1st Session (1:00pm-3:00pm)

2nd Session (3:20pm-5:00pm)

Tower Bridge

 

FERC

Scott Wilcox

FERC

Scott Wilcox

 

1:00pm − 1:20pm

Scott Wilcox

Challenges, collaboration, and solutions. Introductory presentation

3:00pm − 3:20pm

BREAK

1:20pm − 1:40pm

Elizabeth A. Campbell

Yuba River Development Project FERC Integrated Licensing Process: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service perspective

3:20pm − 3:40pm

Sarah Kupferberg               

Declining downstream: Modeling efforts to assess recruitment to frog populations in California’s regulated rivers.

1:40pm − 2:00pm

Greg Pasternack

Use of near-census river science to avoid conflicts in FERC Relicensing due to statistical sampling ambiguity

3:40pm − 4:00pm

Curtis Knight      

Klamath River:  Out of the box FERC Relicensing

2:00pm − 2:20pm

Jarvis Caldwell

Data overload: Interfacing with new graphical tools for handling a data rich environment

4:00pm − 4:20pm

Sarah Yarnell 

Management of the spring snowmelt recession in regulated systems

2:20pm − 2:40pm

Catalina E. Reyes

Collaborative efforts to provide cool water for holding spring-run Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in Butte Creek, Butte County, CA.

4:20pm − 4:40pm

Ryan Peek      

Plasticity of breeding in Foothill Yellow-legged Frog (Rana boylii) in the Sierra Nevada: Best Monitoring Practices

 

2:40pm − 3:00pm

Steve Rothert

4:40pm − 5:00pm

Panel Discussion

Friday Afternoon Technical Session, March 28, 2014

Location

1st Session (1:00pm-3:00pm)

2nd Session (3:20pm-5:00pm)

Schoolhouse

 

Stream Management & Restoration in California

Joe Merz & Rocko Brown

Stream Management & Restoration in California

Joe Merz & Rocko Brown

 

1:00pm − 1:20pm

Rocko Brown

Opening remarks

3:00pm − 3:20pm

BREAK

1:20pm − 1:40pm

John Hannon

Collaboratively improving Salmonid spawning, rearing, and passage in Central Valley Project rivers

 

3:20pm − 3:40pm

Zac Jackson

Doubling anadromous salmonid and sturgeon populations in the California Central Valley; 25 years of challenge and success

1:40pm − 2:00pm

Tom Gohring

Collaboration and resource management in highly populated California

 

3:40pm − 4:00pm

Rene Henery

Collaborative kernels: Advances in the conservation and restoration of mountain meadows and streams in California

2:00pm − 2:20pm

Laurel Marcus

Fish friendly farming – Collaborative restoration and management

4:00pm − 4:20pm

Jose Setka

Evolution on the Mokelumne River: from litigation to collaboration

2:20pm − 2:40pm

Chester Anderson

Coordination and communication in the middle San Joaquin River watershed

 

4:20pm − 4:40pm

Joseph Merz

Merced River Ranch: Collaboration on a science based, community-driven restoration project

2:40pm − 3:00pm

Carol Mahoney

Using the F-Word: FISH

 

4:40pm − 5:00pm

Panel Discussion

Friday Afternoon Technical Session, March 28, 2014

Location

1st Session (1:00pm-3:00pm)

2nd Session (3:20pm-5:00pm)

Central Pacific

 

Science Informing Green Sturgeon Restoration

Andrea Drauch Schreier

Science Informing Green Sturgeon Restoration

Andrea Drauch Schreier

 

 

 

1:00pm − 1:20pm

Ethan Mora

Estimating the abundance and distribution of spawning green sturgeon using a DIDSON acoustic camera

3:00pm − 3:20pm

BREAK

1:20pm − 1:40pm

Alicia Seesholtz

Are green sturgeon only found in the Feather River during wet water years? Myth busters and its implications…

3:20pm − 3:40pm

Olaf Langness

Green sturgeon research in the Washington and Oregon coastal estuaries

 

1:40pm − 2:00pm

David Woodbury

Is recovery of green sturgeon possible?

3:40pm − 4:00pm

Barry McCovey

Effects of river discharge on the outmigration timing of Klamath River green sturgeon

2:00pm − 2:20pm

Josh Strange

Status and origin of green sturgeon of Eel River Basin: Myth or mystery?

4:00pm − 4:20pm

Mike Thomas

Movement behavior of juvenile green sturgeon in the Central Delta

2:20pm − 2:40pm

Andrea Schreier

Non-natal estuary preferences of SDPS and NDPS green sturgeon

4:20pm − 4:40pm

Emily Miller

Seasonal distribution of Green and White Sturgeon in the San Francisco Bay, Delta, and Sacramento River

2:40pm − 3:00pm

Jamilynn Poletto

The efficacy of deterrents and pipe modifications in reducing entrainment of juvenile green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) at unscreened water diversions

4:40pm − 5:00pm

Panel Discussion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday Morning Technical Sessions, March 29, 2014

Location

1st Session (8:00pm-10:00am)

2nd Session (10:20am-12:00pm)

Central Pacific

Acoustic Telemetry

Russell Bellmer

Acoustic Telemetry

Russell Bellmer

 

8:00am − 8:20am

Russ Bellmer

Dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) is an acoustic camera presently being deployed state wide to assess Salmonid populations under the California Coastal Salmonid Monitoring Plan

10:00am − 10:20am

BREAK

8:20am − 8:40am

Mathew Metheny

Using DIDSON in life cycle monitoring on Redwood Creek, Humboldt County

10:20am − 10:40am

Sam Bankston

DIDSON in Southern California streams: challenges and potential solutions

8:40am − 9:00am

Zachary S. Larson

Use of dual frequency identification Sonar (DIDSON) to monitor steelhead escapement in the Smith River, California

10:40am − 11:00am

Ryan Cuthbert

Vaki Riverwatcher Case Studies: Functionality improvements to curtail limitations

 

9:00am − 9:20am

Benjamin J. Atencio

Estimating coho salmon and steelhead escapement for Lagunitas Creek using DIDSON technology

11:00am − 11:20am

Joshua Strange

Mobile applications of DIDSON sonar for green sturgeon research

9:20am − 9:40am

Matthew R. Johnson

Using DIDSON during turbid water periods to compliment overhead and underwater video to estimate Chinook salmon escapement in tributaries of the Upper Sacramento River

11:20am − 11:40am

Gretchen Umlauf

Alternative use of sonar in detection and discernment of fish species in short range, turbid areas, with Adaptive Resolution Imaging Sonar (ARIS) short range units

 

9:40am − 10:00am

Dave Vogel

Use of DIDSON to evaluate fish screens, water diversions, juvenile salmon rearing, and predatory fish

11:40am − 12:00pm

Panel Discussion

Saturday Morning Technical Sessions, March 29, 2014

Location

1st Session (8:00pm-10:00am)

2nd Session (10:20am-12:00pm)

Schoolhouse

 

Can we link salmonid biology with freshwater habitat for successful restoration?

Laurie Earley & Sean Gallagher

Can we link salmonid biology with freshwater habitat for successful restoration?

Laurie Earley & Sean Gallagher

 

8:00am − 8:20am

Mike Wallace

Response of juvenile Salmonids to habitat restoration in the stream-estuary ecotone of Humboldt Bay

10:00am − 10:20am

BREAK

 

8:20am − 8:40am

Mark Gard

Tuolumne, Stanislaus and Yuba River floodplain versus flow Relationships

 

 

10:20am − 10:40am

Laura Valoppi

Successes and challenges of fisheries resources in a large restoration project

8:40am − 9:00am

Gregory M. Andrew Enhancing Winter Habitat for Salmonids in Lagunitas Creek

10:40am − 11:00am

Neil Lassettre

Dry Creek Habitat Enhancement Project: Linking habitat conditions to Salmonid ecology and production through monitoring and adaptive management

9:00am − 9:20am

Justin Wood

Ecosystem response to spawning bed enhancement in Deer Creek, Yuba River tributary

11:00am − 11:20am

Jerrad Goddell

Use of redd caps and egg tubes to asses spawning habitat of Chinook Salmon.

9:20am − 9:40am

Sarah Gallagher

Clear Creek Restoration

11:20am − 11:40am

Matthew Deitch

A process for hydrologic restoration for salmonids in coastal California

9:40am − 10:00am

Joe Merz

Restoration under suboptimal conditions: Examples from Chinook salmon and steelhead projects in the California Central Valley

11:40am − 12:00pm

Stephen Swales

Back from the brink – Challenges, collaborations and solutions for salmon recovery in California

Saturday Morning Technical Session, March 29, 2014

Location

1st Session (6 talks, 8:00am-10:00am)

2nd Session (5 talks, 10:20am-12:00pm)

Steamboat

Native Fishes

Wayne Lifton

Native Fishes

Wayne Lifton

 

 

8:00am − 8:20am

Larry Brown

Implications of water temperatures from climate change projections for Delta smelt in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

10:00am − 10:20am

BREAK

 

8:20am − 8:40am

Carl L. Demetropoulos

Abundance and conditions of the federally threatened Santa Ana sucker (Catostomus santaanae) in Big Tujunga Creek; Influence of habitat dynamics and benthic macroinvertebrate species and composition

10:20am − 10:40am

Christopher J. Donohoe

Migratory histories, maternal origin, and connectivity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from the Lower Mokelumne River

8:40am − 9:00am

Stewart B. Reid

Exploring the historical, current and future distribution of Pacific Lamprey in California

 

10:40am − 11:00am

Rick Wilder

Potential Effects of Future Climate Change on Salmonids in California’s Central Valley

9:00am − 9:20am

Shawn D. Chase

Maximizing habitat for native species in flood control channels

11:00am − 11:20am

Nicolas Retford

Ocean conditions and growth rates of Scott Creek Steelhead

9:20am − 9:40am

Wayne Lifton

Investigations into Hardhead (Mylopharodon conocephalus) life history in the San Joaquin Drainage

11:20am − 11:40am

Amber Manfree

A new look at the fishes of Suisun Marsh: visualizing spatiotemporal data with animated maps

9:40am − 10:00am

Dennis E. Cocherell Physiological tools for guiding native fish management near hydroelectric power generation facilities: a case study of hardhead minnows

11:40am − 12:00pm

Megan Sabal

Interactive effects of a non-native predator and habitat alterations on native juvenile salmon

 

Saturday Afternoon Technical Session, March 29, 2014

Location

1st Session (1:00pm-3:00pm)

2nd Session (3:20pm-4:40pm)

Schoolhouse

General Symposium

Michael Carbiener

General Symposium

Michael Carbiener

 

1:20pm − 1:40pm

Scott Bauer

Impacts of surface water diversions for marijuana cultivation on aquatic habitat in four Northwestern California watersheds

3:00pm − 3:20pm

BREAK

 

1:40pm − 2:00pm

William Beckon

How to estimate trophic position of fish from lag in contaminant bioaccumulation

3:20pm − 3:40pm

Jim Reynolds

Electrofishing with spheres, rings and rods: Electrical fields of three common electrodes

2:00pm − 2:20pm

Kevin Kumagai

Real-time 2-Dimensional tracking in the tailrace of a hydroelectric dam

3:40pm − 4:00pm

Rob Titus

Is the Sacramento River fall-run Chinook salmon sport fishery self-regulating?

2:20pm − 2:40pm

 Shaun Minton

How the advancement in field data collection devices can help you get more work done in less time with better results

4:00pm − 4:20pm

Catherine Karp

Summary of 2013 Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry Behavior Study at the Bureau of Reclamation Tracy Fish Collection Facility, Tracy, CA

 

2:40pm − 3:00pm

David Delaney

Challenges of predicting the movement of juvenile steelhead in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

 

4:20pm − 4:40pm

Andrew Schultz

Predation and gut evacuation rates as measured by acoustic tags in the Tracy Fish Collection Facility Primary Channel

 

1:20pm − 1:40pm

C. Meiling Roddam

Rearing location of juvenile Chinook salmon within the Shasta River basin as determined by otolith strontium isotopic ratio analysis

 

4:40pm − 5:00pm

 

Saturday Afternoon Technical Session, March 29, 2014

Location

1st Session (1:00pm-3:00pm)

2nd Session (3:20pm-5:00pm)

Central Pacific

SJRRP

Elif Fehm-Sullivan

SJRRP

Elif Fehm-Sullivan

 

1:20pm − 1:40pm

Elif Fehm-Sullivan

Introduction of session and history of San Joaquin River Restoration Program

3:00pm − 3:20pm

BREAK

1:40pm − 2:00pm

John Netto

Timelines and deadlines:  Aligning settlement deadlines, project schedules, and Salmon reintroduction on the San Joaquin River

3:20pm − 3:40pm

Nathaniel Butler

Availability of thermal stratification and thermal refugia in the middle San Joaquin River system

2:00pm − 2:20pm

Rhonda Reed

Replacing something that doesn’t exist: Regulatory, social, and biological issues for reintroduction of Chinook Salmon into the San Joaquin River

3:40pm − 4:00pm

Leslie Mirise

Restoration leads to innovation: The Arroyo Canal and Sack Dam multi-species transport channel/fish ladder

 

2:20pm − 2:40pm

Blair Greiman

Quantifying existing chinook Salmon rearing and migration habitat for the San Joaquin River Restoration Program

4:00pm − 4:20pm

Michelle Workman

Fisheries investigations conducted in the San Joaquin River Restoration area and their relation to salmon reintroduction in the San Joaquin River

2:40pm − 3:00pm

 Paul S. Bergman

San Joaquin River floodplain habitat: modeling juvenile Chinook salmon needs 

4:20pm − 4:40pm

Kyle Griffiths

Trends in piscivory in an altered environment of the San Joaquin River

1:20pm − 1:40pm

 Panel Discussion

4:40pm − 5:00pm

Panel Discussion

Saturday Afternoon Technical Session, March 29, 2014

Location

1st Session (1:00pm-3:00pm)

2nd Session (3:20pm-5:00pm)

Steamboat

Fish Genetics

Scott Blankenship

Fish Genetics

Scott Blankenship

 

1:00pm − 1:20pm

Scott Blankenship

Genetic identification of salvaged winter-run Chinook salmon at SWP and CVP facilities 

3:00pm − 3:20pm

BREAK

1:20pm − 1:40pm

Michael Hellmair

Low genetic diversity and reduced life history variation increase extinction risk within insular populations of an endangered fish

3:20pm − 3:40pm

 Gregg Schumer

Using genetics to enhance and integrate existing Delta monitoring programs

1:40pm − 2:00pm

Molly Stephens

The power of SNPs to understand past stocking and contemporary status of native trout populations

3:40pm − 4:00pm

Scott Brandl

Quantifying incidence of predation using genetic barcodes and its potential as a near real-time ecological monitoring tool

2:00pm − 2:20pm

Anna Sturrock

Life history portfolio within salmon populations: When do dufferent outmigration phenotypes contribute

4:00pm − 4:20pm

Chris Hogle

Don’t need a mate, just need a trout: genetic and demographic structure of three western pearlshell mussel (Margaritifera falcata) populations in the western Great Basin 

2:20pm − 2:40pm

Jesse Wiesenfeld 

Riverscape genetics identifies two genetically divergent groups and a contact zone in Klamath River speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus)

4:20pm − 4:40pm

Virginia Afentoulis

Efficacy test of a tag designed to signal when a fish has been consumed.

2:40pm − 3:00pm

Pat Brandes

Genetics data and efficiency testing for deriving abundance of four runs of juvenile Chinook Salmon at Chipps Island

4:40pm − 5:00pm

Paul S. Bergman

A pilot mark-recapture study using spot patterns of Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Stanislaus River, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EARLY Registration extended to March 10th

Early registration has been extended to March 10th midnight.  This will be the last extension, so register asap.  After this date registration cost will go up for full members and non-members.  Abstracts are due by 5pm today.  Space is limited.  To accomodate the number of abstracts submitted, we will have 5 concurrent sessions on Friday and Saturday.  The block rooms at the Embassy Suites is now full. If you still need a hotel room, please e-mail the conference chair ( Norm Ponferrada normponferrada@gmail.com ).  Hope to see you all there.  This shaping up to  be the best meeting in years.